Careers and Employability

Kick start your career with physics

Careers available to physics graduates include finance, technology, software development, marketing, media production, medicine and management consultancy to name a few. The starting salary of physics graduates is consistently significantly higher than the national average.

Our guide to physics careers Physics opens doors has more guidance on careers available to physics graduates , as does the Institute of Physics.

Graduates from the School of Physics and Astronomy go on to work in a wide variety of careers. Some transfer skills gained during study into areas such as finance or IT. Other graduates continue to a higher degree such as a PhD or MSc, often as a precursor to a career in physics research. 

You will graduate with an impressive array of skills including:

  • high-level numeracy and data analysis skills
  • excellent IT and coding expertise
  • problem-solving skills
  • reporting and communication skills
  • practical laboratory skills. 

A report by the Institute of Physics in 2012 showed that

physics graduates in employment earned 14% more than the average graduate salary.

 

What our graduates do

Of our 2015 graduates, 86% in of those in work were are graduate level employment, (2015 Destination of Leavers of Higher Education survey).

Recent graduates from the School have gone into roles such as:

Econometrician Media Com

Client and IoT Software Application Engineer Intel

Web App development consultant Kings Research Consultancy

PhD Student University of Oxford

Graduate Account Manager Dunn and Bradstreet

Digital campaign manager ESI media

Consultant Bluefin Solutions

Trainee Healthcare Scientist, Medical Physics – NHS

Associate Technical Consultant – Open Symmetry (management consulting)

 

Find out more about how we support our students:

Valuable internships

Dedicated careers support

Work as a Physics Ambassador 

 

Juno Champion

The school holds Juno Champion status, the highest award of this IoP scheme to recognise and reward departments that can demonstrate they have taken action to address the under-representation of women in university physics and to encourage better practice for both women and men.