There is a growing number of projects across the UK giving the opportunity for school students to run their own research projects. Ever wondered how the projects come together? Are you a researcher or teacher and thought about running such a project?

Before the Cassini spacecraft makes its final plunge into Saturn's atmosphere in September this year, one of its last acts will be to take a photo of an intriguing object that Professor Carl Murray of the School of Physics and Astronomy has been studying for nearly four years.

Twenty-five years ago today, on 9 January 1992, astronomers published the first unambiguous discovery of an exoplanet — a planet beyond our Solar System. Since then the search for, and study of, exoplanets has become an exciting and productive branch of astronomy, one in which researchers in Queen Mary's School of Physics and Astronomy are actively engaged.

Dr Guillem Anglada-Escudé from the School of Physics and Astronomy has been named one of the top ten people who matter in science in 2016 by the prestigious scientific journal Nature.

In 1999, Dr David Berman attended a conference about string theory in Copenhagen. During the course of a rather lively conference dinner a wager was made.

QMUL has been awarded the Gold Engage Watermark by the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement, in recognition of its public engagement work.

On 30 November 2016 NASA's Cassini spacecraft began a series of dives through Saturn's rings, the first stage in the probe's "grand finale" investigation of the gas giant planet.

This new work by sculptor Chris Williams was inspired by the work of the Centre for Research in String Theory here in the School of Physics and Astronomy. Entitled "Particle" it was recently exhibited in the Attic Gallery Summer exhibition.

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