15 September.  At around 11:30 this morning the Cassini spacecraft sent its final signal to Earth as it plunged into the thick atmosphere of the planet Saturn, bringing to an end its 20-year voyage of discovery, a voyage that has provided scientists with a wealth of data about the ringed planet and its moons, along with some of the most thought-provoking images ever captured

The Pale Red Dot campaign, led by astronomers in QMUL’s School of Physics and Astronomy in partnership with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), has been shortlisted for a Times Higher Education Award in the category “Research Project of the Year: STEM”.

Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has two vacancies for 36 months for a Postdoctoral Research Assistants, one each in the The School of Engineering and Materials Science  and the School of Physics and Astronomy as a result of a successful EPSRC grant under the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund. The aim of the project is to develop and investigate low cost functional carbon materials to be used as negative electrodes in Na-ion batteries. 

ATLAS event display showing a candidate event of the Higgs boson decaying into two muons

The Particle Physics Research Centre at QMUL have been searching for the very rare decay of the Higgs boson into two muons harvesting the data collected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Only one in every 5000 Higgs bosons decays in this specific way and the ATLAS team at QMUL lead by Antony Fray and Eram Rizvi have been studying this elusive decay in the last year.

physics graduates

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K), a third-generation Water Cherenkov detector and the latest in an illustrious series of world-leading experiments located in Japan, is being developed by an international collaboration.

The international T2K Collaboration, where Queen Mary group plays significant roles, strengthened its previous hint that the symmetry between matter and antimatter may be violated for neutrino oscillation.  A preliminary analysis of T2K’s latest data rejects the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95% confidence (2σ) level.

We will be hosting a Cosmology SWG meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, in December 2017. The aim of the meeting is to discuss various cosmology-relevant topics (e.g. recent changes to the SKA specifications), and to spend time working on collaborative projects within the focus groups (e.g.

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