Searches for very rare decays of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS experiment

ATLAS event display showing a candidate event of the Higgs boson decaying into two muons

The Particle Physics Research Centre at QMUL have been searching for the very rare decay of the Higgs boson into two muons harvesting the data collected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Only one in every 5000 Higgs bosons decays in this specific way and the ATLAS team at QMUL lead by Antony Fray and Eram Rizvi have been studying this elusive decay in the last year. This study is crucial to establish the properties of the Higgs boson and how it interacts with the rest of the fundamental particles. The analysis has been now published by the prestigious journal series Physics Review Letters and it has been highlighted as Editor's Choice by the journal itself.

We are first in London for overall student satisfaction

physics graduates

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

The results of the survey, which questions UK undergraduates on various aspects of their student experience, places physics and astronomy 4% higher than the sector average and fourth in the UK for overall satisfaction in Russell Group universities offering the subject..

 

The Hyper-Kamiokande Project is in the MEXT Large Projects Roadmap

Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K), a third-generation Water Cherenkov detector and the latest in an illustrious series of world-leading experiments located in Japan, is being developed by an international collaboration. It will take advantage of its predecessors:  the double Nobel prize winning experiment (Super-)Kamiokande and the extremely succesful K2K (1999-2004) and T2K (2010-) long baseline neutrino experiments. T2K just rejected the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95%.

T2K presents hint of CP violation by neutrinos

The international T2K Collaboration, where Queen Mary group plays significant roles, strengthened its previous hint that the symmetry between matter and antimatter may be violated for neutrino oscillation.  A preliminary analysis of T2K’s latest data rejects the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95% confidence (2σ) level. With nearly twice the neutrino data in 2017 compared to their 2016 results, T2K has performed a new analysis of neutrino and antineutrino data using a new event reconstruction algorithm for interactions in the far detector, Super-Kamiokande. http://t2k-experiment.org/2017/08/t2k-2017-cpv/

SKA Cosmology SWG Meeting

We will be hosting a Cosmology SWG meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, in December 2017. The aim of the meeting is to discuss various cosmology-relevant topics (e.g. recent changes to the SKA specifications), and to spend time working on collaborative projects within the focus groups (e.g. developing simulations, updating the Red Book, improving requirements documents).   

Date(s)

Monday 18th December 2017 -  Friday 22nd December 2017

Venue

The meeting will be held in the G. O. Jones building at Queen Mary's Mile End campus in London, UK. We will have several rooms available, including a lecture theatre and a couple of smaller meeting rooms. We also hope to support remote participation through video-conferencing software.   

Programme

Come to our Space Sound Effects Short-Film Festival

Alien may have told you “In space no one can hear you scream” but it was wrong! The SSFX Short-Film Festival has challenged independent filmmakers from around the world to create short-films incorporating a series of strange sounds from space recorded by satellites. The results are a collection of films, spanning a wide array of topics and genres, connected only by these sounds.

The festival will showcase these highly creative works, and will hear from the filmmakers involved and festival judges in panel discussions featuring audience Q&A.  Awards will be presented to the best films and a drinks reception will follow.

Tickets are now available.

QMUL hosts SpaceUp London 2017

On Saturday 10 June, space enthusiasts gathered at Queen Mary University of London for SpaceUp London 2017. The day-long space extravaganza, organised by the Planetary Society, was filled with keynote talks, quick-fire talks, breakout discussions, brainstorms, and other opportunities for guests to engage with one another. The audience consisted of medics, theatre students, virtual reality experts, amateur astronomers, satellite companies, and more. 

The day began with a talk by Tom Kerss, an astronomer from the Royal Observatory Greenwich, entitled What We Are Made Of, in which he explained how the atoms that make us up are forged in stars and that we are each truly part of the cosmos.  

Red Dots — the hunt for planets around nearby stars resumes

Last year a team of astronomers led by Guillem Anglada Escude of the School of Physics and Astronomy, found Proxima b, an Earth-like planet in orbit around Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the Sun — now they are looking for its siblings!

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