School Colloquium: Organic semiconductors - management of spin

Abstract: Pi-conjugated organic molecules and polymers now provide a set of well-performing semiconductors that support devices, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as used in smart-phone displays and lighting, field-effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic diodes (PVs). These are attractive materials to manufacture, particularly for large-area applications where they can be processed by direct printing, so that the cost of materials and processing can be very low. This practical success is made possible by breakthroughs in the understanding and engineering of the underlying semiconductor science. The physics of organic semiconductors is often controlled by large electron-hole Coulomb interactions and by large spin exchange energies. Management of excited state spin is fundamental for efficient LED and solar cells operation.

Celebrate the International Women Day with SPA

SPA and the Juno Committee is celebrating the International Women's Day with a special lecture on women and physics in the developing world. Join us on Wednesday 9th March at 13:30 in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theater. Dr Kate Shaw is a particle physics researcher working in the ATLAS experiment at the CERN collider. She is also passionate ambassador of physics research in developing countries.

Kate will tell us about her work in the middle and far East. She will illustrate and discuss her experience focusing on the participation of women. Discussion will follow about women and physics in academia and UK.

See event agenda here: https://indico.ph.qmul.ac.uk/indico/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=87

Half-Life: A mysterious tale of neutrinos and spies

Frank Close, acclaimed author of several books explaining physics to the general audience, will come to the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL on Friday March 4th at 4:15pm in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theatre. He will talk about his latest book telling the story of physicist Bruno Pontecorvo.

LIGO’s cosmological revolution heralds new age for Queen Mary Physicists

Today’s announcement from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) concerning gravitational waves has rekindled excitement in the amazing predictions of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. The detection of these waves provides experimental verification of Einstein’s relativity in even the most extreme circumstances, the collision of two black holes.

A gravitational wave is like a ripple that stretches space and time, moving at the speed of light. Their existence has been postulated for a hundred years, but finding them required the highest precision in experimental physics and some luck.

To stand a chance of finding these moving ripples in spacetime we need a large source of accelerating matter. The collision and merger of blackholes is one such source though there could certainly be others.

Public Lecture on LHC Future

On 2 March 2016 18:30 we will have the next in our series of public lectures, with Dr Eram Rizvi discussing the next 20 years of the Large Hadron Collider. Having discovered the Higgs Boson in its first run, Run-2 (2015-2018) has almost doubled the energy opening up the possibility of new discoveries. The analysis of this new data is underway and initial results are starting to be released. At the same time, plans to upgrade the LHC and its experiments are currently being made to increase the number of particles that can be accelerated whilst improving the quality of the data at the same time. The ultimate aim is to solve the big questions of the nature of dark matter, the differences between matter and anti-matter and the first direct observations of quantum gravity phenomena. The game isn't over - it's only just begun.

Postgraduate Open Evening - 10th Feb

We're running a postgraduate open evening on Wednesday the 10th Feb from 4.30 - 7.30.

If you're considering an MSc in Physics or Astrophysics, this is a great opportuntity to find out more. Join us for an evening of talks and a chance to chat to academic programme directors and admissions staff. 

Book a place

Einsteins Legacy meeting

On the 28th and 29th of November we hosted a meeting to celebrate the 100th anniversary of general relativity. It was called Einstein's Legacy, and included plenary and public talks, as well as outreach events and a poster session. Around 500 people attended. Photos and videos can be found here.

School Colloquium: Antimatter particles in outer space

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment operates since May 2011 on board of the International Space Station to search for primordial anti-matter, to study the light anti-matter components in the Cosmic Rays (CR) and to perform a precision study of the CR composition and energy spectrum.

AMS has been conceived as a multi purpose spectrometer based on the state-of-the-art technology used in high energy physics experiments: a permanent magnet surrounds a 6.4 m2 double-sided silicon micro-strip tracker, trigger and velocity measurements are insured by four planes of scintillators, redundant measurements of particle velocity, energy, charge are performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors and a 3D imaging Electromagnetic Calorimeter. A Transition Radiation Detector allows the discrimination of electrons from protons up to the TeV.

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