News archive

What’s inside a black hole? — the next School of Physics and Astronomy public talk

Dr Masaki Shigemori will give the next SPA public talk at 7:00 pm on Thursday 22 March. He will describe what we know so far about black holes and will explain how the novel physics behind string theory may shed some light on their interior workings. This talk will take you into a colourful world of strange and mind-boggling concepts, at the very limits of what we can know about the Universe. 

Postgraduate Taught Open Evening

Find out why MSc study might be great for your career and what our programmes in physics or astronomy could offer you.

7th February, 4.30-7.30

Mile End Campus

This event is in two parts, a general open event with information stands, and a physics and astronomy breakout session with talks and Q+A. Please book places on one or both parts depending on your interest.

Prof. William Gillin shortlisted for QMUL Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

Prof. William Gillin of the School of Physics and Astronomy and Director of QMUL’s Materials Research Institute has been shortlisted for the Bruce Dickinson Entrepreneur of the Year Award. His nomination stems from the establishment, in June 2017, of a spin-out company called Chromosol, which aims to revolutionise optical communication networks. 

Innovative Training Network SAGEX

The Centre for Research in String Theory has been invited to coordinate the preparation of the grant agreement of the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network of the European Commission: SAGEX "Scattering Amplitudes: from Geometry to Experiment". The network will support 15 Early-Stage Researcher (PhD) positions to begin in 2018/19.

QMUL astronomer helps to find dormant black hole

Queen Mary astronomer Dr Guillem Anglada Escudé is a member of an international team of astronomers who have used a novel method to find a black hole hiding in a nearby group of stars. Most black holes we know about were identified by the intense radiation emitted from hot gas falling into the black hole; but now the astronomers have been able to detect a “dormant” black hole that is not actively swallowing material.