News archive

Inaugural lecture by Prof David Berman

On 14 November Prof. David Berman will give his inaugural lecture on “The symmetries of nature and hidden extra dimensions”. He will give an account of how our understanding of nature has progressed through a deeper understanding of its symmetries. By proposing extra, as yet undiscovered, dimensions to space these symmetries become explained by the geometry of the hidden space.

Congratulations to 2017 Physics Nobel Prize winners

The School of Physics and Astronomy offers warm congratulations to Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, recipients of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions to the detection of gravitational waves by LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory).

Cassini makes its dramatic exit

15 September.  At around 11:30 this morning the Cassini spacecraft sent its final signal to Earth as it plunged into the thick atmosphere of the planet Saturn, bringing to an end its 20-year voyage of discovery, a voyage that has provided scientists with a wealth of data about the ringed planet and its moons, and some of the most thought-provoking images ever captured.

Two postdoctoral research assistant positions

Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has two vacancies for 36 months for a Postdoctoral Research Assistants, one each in the The School of Engineering and Materials Science  and the School of Physics and Astronomy as a result of a successful EPSRC grant under the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund. The aim of the project is to develop and investigate low cost functional carbon materials to be used as negative electrodes in Na-ion batteries. 

Searches for very rare decays of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS experiment

The Particle Physics Research Centre at QMUL have been searching for the very rare decay of the Higgs boson into two muons harvesting the data collected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Only one in every 5000 Higgs bosons decays in this specific way and the ATLAS team at QMUL lead by Antony Fray and Eram Rizvi have been studying this elusive decay in the last year.

We are first in London for overall student satisfaction

Physics and astronomy ranks first in London for overall student satisfaction according to the results of the 2017 National Student Survey (NSS), based on an overall satisfaction rating of 92%. The School has previously ranked first in London in the NSS in 2016, 2015, and 2014.

The Hyper-Kamiokande Project is in the MEXT Large Projects Roadmap

Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K), a third-generation Water Cherenkov detector and the latest in an illustrious series of world-leading experiments located in Japan, is being developed by an international collaboration. It will take advantage of its predecessors:  the double Nobel prize winning experiment (Super-)Kamiokande and the extremely succesful K2K (1999-2004) and T2K (2010-) long baseline neutrino experiments.

T2K presents hint of CP violation by neutrinos

The international T2K Collaboration, where Queen Mary group plays significant roles, strengthened its previous hint that the symmetry between matter and antimatter may be violated for neutrino oscillation.  A preliminary analysis of T2K’s latest data rejects the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95% confidence (2σ) level.

SKA Cosmology SWG Meeting

We will be hosting a Cosmology SWG meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, in December 2017. The aim of the meeting is to discuss various cosmology-relevant topics (e.g. recent changes to the SKA specifications), and to spend time working on collaborative projects within the focus groups (e.g. developing simulations, updating the Red Book, improving requirements documents).   

Date(s)

Come to our Space Sound Effects Short-Film Festival

Alien may have told you “In space no one can hear you scream” but it was wrong! The SSFX Short-Film Festival has challenged independent filmmakers from around the world to create short-films incorporating a series of strange sounds from space recorded by satellites. The results are a collection of films, spanning a wide array of topics and genres, connected only by these sounds.

QMUL hosts SpaceUp London 2017

On Saturday 10 June, space enthusiasts gathered at Queen Mary University of London for SpaceUp London 2017. The day-long space extravaganza, organised by the Planetary Society, was filled with keynote talks, quick-fire talks, breakout discussions, brainstorms, and other opportunities for guests to engage with one another.

Red Dots — the hunt for planets around nearby stars resumes

Last year a team of astronomers led by Guillem Anglada Escude of the School of Physics and Astronomy, found Proxima b, an Earth-like planet in orbit around Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the Sun — now they are looking for its siblings!

Next Undergraduate Open Day - 23rd and 24th June

Want to find out more about studying for a physics degree at QMUL?

Book a place on the University's next open day and come along to the department for taster talks, a session in our teaching laboratory, an observatory demo and more. Talk to staff and current students and get a real feel for what undergraduate life as a physicist is like.

June 15 Public Lecture: Our Home, the Milky Way Galaxy

On June 15 at 7:00pm there will be another School of Physics and Astronomy public talk. We are delighted to welcome QMUL alumna Prof. Rosemary Wyse of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, USA. Prof. Wyse is an astronomer with an international reputation whose research interests include galaxy formation, composition and evolution. She will speak about “Our Home, the Milky Way Galaxy”.

Queen Mary astronomer on Time magazine list of 100 most influential people

Astronomer Guillem Anglada-Escudé of the School of Physics and Astronomy has been named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of 2016. His inclusion on this prestigious list, in the Pioneers category, recognises his discovery of the exoplanet Proxima b, in orbit around the nearest star to Earth (bar the Sun, of course).

QMUL student gets a taste of astronaut training

QMUL physics student Kieran Hashmi has recently returned from the trip of a lifetime — experiencing astronaut training in Russia’s famous cosmonaut training complex.

Kieran’s visit began in Moscow’s Red Square, the scene of Yuri Gagarin’s celebratory parade after his return from space in 1961, and he also visited what remains of Russia’s own space shuttle, the Buran, which was destroyed in 2002 when its hangar collapsed.

Ancient stardust sheds light on the first stars

Astronomer Dr David Quénard of the School of Physics and Astronomy is one of the authors of a research paper, published on 8 March in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, that reports the discovery of an unexpectedly large amount of interstellar dust in a very distant galaxy. The galaxy, known as A2744_YD4, is seen only 600 million years after the Big Bang and is the most distant galaxy in which dust has been detected.

PsiStar students in visit at CERN

On Monday February 20, a delegation of PsiStar students have visited CERN and its facilities. They visited the first synchrocyclotron built at CERN in 1954 and then they went underground to visit the cathedral-size CMS and ATLAS experiments, taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Space Sounds Inspire Film Competition

Filmmakers will have the chance to use real-life sound recorded from space in a new competition launched by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

QMUL launches Research in Schools report

There is a growing number of projects across the UK giving the opportunity for school students to run their own research projects. Ever wondered how the projects come together? Are you a researcher or teacher and thought about running such a project?

Farewell to Peggy

Before the Cassini spacecraft makes its final plunge into Saturn's atmosphere in September this year, one of its last acts will be to take a photo of an intriguing object that Professor Carl Murray of the School of Physics and Astronomy has been studying for nearly four years.

Twenty-fifth anniversary of the discovery of the first exoplanet

Twenty-five years ago today, on 9 January 1992, astronomers published the first unambiguous discovery of an exoplanet — a planet beyond our Solar System. Since then the search for, and study of, exoplanets has become an exciting and productive branch of astronomy, one in which researchers in Queen Mary's School of Physics and Astronomy are actively engaged.