News archive

QMUL astronomer in top ten scientists list

Dr Guillem Anglada-Escudé from the School of Physics and Astronomy has been named one of the top ten people who matter in science in 2016 by the prestigious scientific journal Nature. The annual list, known as "Nature's 10", highlights researchers from around the world who have made a major impact this year.

Cassini Crash

On 30 November 2016 NASA's Cassini spacecraft began a series of dives through Saturn's rings, the first stage in the probe's "grand finale" investigation of the gas giant planet.

SIGNALLING INSIDE WIRED NEURAL NETWORKS: A QUEST FOR PRINCIPLES

Memory formation in the brain is thought to rely on the remodeling of synaptic connections which eventually results in neural network rewiring. This remodeling is likely to involve ultrathin astroglial protrusions which often occur in the immediate vicinity of excitatory synapses. The phenomenology, cellular mechanisms, and causal relationships of such astroglial restructuring remain, however, poorly understood.

Experimental Black Hole evaporation

Over the past decade it has become clear that one can, in analog systems, test Hawking's predition from 1974 that black holes have a temperature created by the properties of the metric near the horizon.

Stars get their discs in a twist

An international team of astronomers that includes Richard Nelson of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a truly unusual example of planet formation around a star.

New Earth-like planet found around nearest star

Clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System, has been found by an international team of scientists led by astronomers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Top for Student Satisfaction in London

The School of Physics and Astronomy has been ranked first in London for overall satisfaction for the third year running in the 2016 National Student Survey (NSS 2016). 

The results of the nationwide poll of final year undergraduates are a reflection of the School’s commitment to provide a friendly and supportive learning environment with the highest quality of teaching.

Post exam open day - Undergraduate

Thinking again about where you'd like to study next year?

Join admissions staff and current students for a laid-back event designed to give you a second chance to find out about life as a student at the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL.

1.00pm - 3.00pm Thursday 14th July

Register for our Undergraduate Open Day

As part of a university-wide event, we're running demonstrations, talks, tours, activities and taster lectures over two days designed to give you an insight into life as a physics student. We'll also be on hand to answer questions about applications, study options and talk about what a physics degree from QMUL can do for your future!

Student blog gets underway Articlephysics.org

The School of Physics and Astronomy student blog articlephysics.org has picked up momentum since its launch in February. The blog now features several stories by different student bloggers covering everything from MSc project choice and revision strategies to gender equality in physics and life as a student in London.

Gabriele Travaglini receives Bessel Award

Professor Gabriele Travaglini has been awarded one of the 2016 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Awards of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The Bessel Award is given each year to researchers from all disciplines in recognition of their outstanding research record and exceptional future promise.

Cosmic Con Rounds Off Physics Research in Schools

On 21 March 2016, the Outreach team at the School of Physics and Astronomy ran the first annual Cosmic Con 2016. This student conference featured talks and posters by 15-18 year old students from 5 local schools and sixth forms, who presented the results of their six-month long independent research projects in collaboration with Queen Mary University of London.

New video: MSc programmes in Astrophysics and Physics

Hear Simon and Alex, two of our current master's level students, talk about their work at the School of Physics and Astronomy. Find out about facilities, projects, academic supervision and taught modules as well as the inspiring nature of higher level physics and astronomy. 

New MSc Astrophysics scholarships

Students enrolling on an MSc in Astrophysics in 2016 are eligible to apply for a new scholarship scheme for both home/EU students and overseas students.

The 2 amounts of £2,250 (home/EU students) and one amount of £4,500 (overseas students) and are open to students with a first class bachelor's degree (or international equivalent) in related field.

School Colloquium: Organic semiconductors - management of spin

Abstract: Pi-conjugated organic molecules and polymers now provide a set of well-performing semiconductors that support devices, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as used in smart-phone displays and lighting, field-effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic diodes (PVs).

Celebrate the International Women Day with SPA

SPA and the Juno Committee is celebrating the International Women's Day with a special lecture on women and physics in the developing world. Join us on Wednesday 9th March at 13:30 in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theater. Dr Kate Shaw is a particle physics researcher working in the ATLAS experiment at the CERN collider. She is also passionate ambassador of physics research in developing countries.

Half-Life: A mysterious tale of neutrinos and spies

Frank Close, acclaimed author of several books explaining physics to the general audience, will come to the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL on Friday March 4th at 4:15pm in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theatre. He will talk about his latest book telling the story of physicist Bruno Pontecorvo.

LIGO’s cosmological revolution heralds new age for Queen Mary Physicists

Today’s announcement from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) concerning gravitational waves has rekindled excitement in the amazing predictions of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. The detection of these waves provides experimental verification of Einstein’s relativity in even the most extreme circumstances, the collision of two black holes.

Public Lecture on LHC Future

On 2 March 2016 18:30 we will have the next in our series of public lectures, with Dr Eram Rizvi discussing the next 20 years of the Large Hadron Collider. Having discovered the Higgs Boson in its first run, Run-2 (2015-2018) has almost doubled the energy opening up the possibility of new discoveries. The analysis of this new data is underway and initial results are starting to be released.

Postgraduate Open Evening - 10th Feb

We're running a postgraduate open evening on Wednesday the 10th Feb from 4.30 - 7.30.

If you're considering an MSc in Physics or Astrophysics, this is a great opportuntity to find out more. Join us for an evening of talks and a chance to chat to academic programme directors and admissions staff. 

Einsteins Legacy meeting

On the 28th and 29th of November we hosted a meeting to celebrate the 100th anniversary of general relativity. It was called Einstein's Legacy, and included plenary and public talks, as well as outreach events and a poster session. Around 500 people attended. Photos and videos can be found here.

School Colloquium: Antimatter particles in outer space

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment operates since May 2011 on board of the International Space Station to search for primordial anti-matter, to study the light anti-matter components in the Cosmic Rays (CR) and to perform a precision study of the CR composition and energy spectrum.

Thomas Young Center (TYC Soiree): New understanding of liquids and supercritical fluids

The moving contact line problem occurs when modelling one fluid replacing another as it moves along a solid surface, a situation widespread throughout industry and nature. Classically, the no-slip boundary condition at the solid substrate, a zero-thickness interface between the fluids, and motion at the three-phase contact line are incompatible - leading to the well-known shear-stress singularity.

Cross-sections at SPA: A Business Engagement event

The School of Physics and Astronomy (SPA) is introducing a new “business club” - aimed at fostering our research connections with industry and the wider society. Today's research funding environment places a high value of impact, which creates new challenges for scientists and new opportunities for interactions between academia and  industry.

Cassini Scientist for a Day Competition

The chance for 10-18 years old UK school students to win prizes by writing about the Cassini mission at Saturn. The deadline of 5pm 26 February is fast approaching. Entrants must choose a target for the Cassini spacecraft to observe and write a 500-word essay proposal making a case to the mission planners.